DM 337 Victorian Age in England

The Victorian Age of England

Queen Victoria ruled Great Britain from June 20, 1837 to January 22, 1901. Victoria brought a 64 year period of “peace, prosperity, refined sensibilities and national self confidence for Britain.” This period is called the Victorian Age of Britain.

Culturally, the Victorian Age marked the transition away from eighteenth century rationalism of the Georgian Age. The nineteenth century moved from romanticism toward realism in social values and the arts. The era is popularly associated with the Victorian values of social and sexual restraint.

During Victoria¹s reign, the British Empire entered a period of rapid economic expansion. This expansion, combined with increasing industrialization and mechanization, established a prolonged period of international growth.

The  English population doubled during Queen Victoria¹s reign. Only Ireland¹s population decreased due to the Irish Potato Famine of 1845. The Irish emigrated from England to the United States, Canada, and Australia. The Victorian age brought great political change and industrial reform. Some scholars date the beginning of the period in terms of sensibilities and political concerns to the passage of the Reform Act of 1832 launching modern universal suffrage and democracy in Britain. Poor labor conditions established new child labor laws and rise of organized labor. In international relations, the Victorian Age brought a long period of peace as well as economic, colonial, and industrial consolidation. Two important figures in this period of British history are the prime ministers Gladstone and Disraeli.

The works of Dickens, the Bronte sisters, Elliot, and Hardy brought a new realism to English literature that influenced political and social change in England.

This historical set includes three lead-free pewter replica medals of Queen Victoria. These portraits depict lifetime representation of the Queen and appear on the coins during her 64 year reign.

http://www.warrenscoins.com

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